The World According to...

I've learned many things, mostly from television, movies, and video games. But that counts... right?

Posts tagged harry potter

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You know what I’ve always wondered, why didn’t the Order just transport Harry like a muggle? Some of them are muggle born or half blood so they might know how to drive. I’m sure Hermione knew how to drive by DH, and Tonks’ dad was a muggle born so he might have taught her to drive. To me, transporting Harry like a muggle would have confused the Death Eaters because they were expecting brooms and other magical transportation, but that’s just what I think.

Filed under harry potter

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“it is important to fight and fight again, and keep fighting, for only then can evil be kept at bay though never quite eradicated. dark times lie ahead of us and there will be a time when we must choose between what is easy and what is right.” - Albus Dumbledore.

(Source: thebeautyinwhite, via achilliad)

Filed under harry potter

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Seriously Snape, even for you, saying that the curse that Malfoy cast on Hermione to make her teeth grow seemed to not be noticeable is cold. Seriously you are a fucking adult, a fucking professor whose job it is to teach kids to HELP them, to actually be there for a child that needs your help, to resolve arguments, to be a non-biased and impartial judge when two of your students have an argument and fight. You can’t just take points from Harry and Ron and pretty much insult Hermione whilst defended Crab and Malfoy even though we all know that you know that Malfoy probably provoked Harry. A good teacher wouldn’t do that nor would an actually mature adult that knows how to fucking let go of a grudge. 

Snape might have loved Lilly and never could forgive himself for her death, but he could at least be a decent human being to other people. And yes he was a double agent for Dumbledore and the Order and he risked his life to stop Voldemort, but all that does not, I repeat DOES NOT give him an accuse to be a dick nor does it forgive him for six books of being a cruel person to 75% of the school population. Honestly I respect his actions but I do not respect the man

Filed under unpopular opinion Harry Potter severus snape

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Have you’ve notice that it is always Ron who causes the divides between him and his friends. In third year he was pissed at Hermione for being worried about Harry when he got a broom from an unknown source, and fourth year he got mad at Harry for somebody putting Harry’s name in the cup, and he made Hermione cry at the Yule ball because he was jealous of her and Krum. In sixth year he almost blow his entire relationship with Hermione because he was a big prat who couldn’t tell her who he felt. And in book seven he left Harry and Hermione in the forest of Dean whilst looking for Horcurxes. 

Ron’s character flaw is his temper and throughout all the books Ron has been overshadowed by Harry. He is a great friend to both Harry and Hermione and he is just an all around awesome person who I love as a character. JK wrote him perfectly. When I saw Ron is a perfect character I don’t mean that he doesn’t have any character flaws, I mean that his character is so well written that you can understand what he goes through and you can relate with him. That is why Weasley is our king

Filed under Harry Potter Ron Weasley

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jamespottr:

I love this scene in Deathly Hallows Part 2 so much. I love that Hermione is the one to scream “no” and she is the one to get Fenrir off of Lavender. Everything that Lavender and Hermione went through, how much they disliked each other, they put it behind them and it’s so touching. And Lavender really changed as well, like when she stands up in front of Harry in the Great Hall and joined the group in the Room of Requirement. I just love to see Hermione, of all people, feel compassion for Lavender and how they were able to forgive each other.

(Source: katherinesage, via everlarkdandelions)

Filed under no that's okay I'm just crying nbd harry potter flawless

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ihititwithmyaxe:

mothernaturenetwork:

 Harry Potter wizarding genetics decoded



If the wizarding gene is dominant, as J.K. Rowling says in her famous series of Harry Potter books, then how can a wizard be born to muggle parents (non-magical people)? And how can there be squibs (non-magical people born into wizarding lines)?
It seems these baffling genetic questions have finally been answered, thanks to Andrea Klenotiz, a biology student at the University of Delaware.
In a six-page paper, which she sent to Rowling, Klenotiz outlines how the wizarding gene works and even explains why some witches and wizards are more powerful than others.
“Magical ability could be explained by a single autosomal dominant gene if it is caused by an expansion of trinucleotide repeats with non-Mendelian ratios of inheritance,” Klenotiz explains.
What does this mean?
In school we learn the fundamentals of genetics by studying Gregory Mendel’s pea plant experiments and completing basic Punnett squares. Basically, we’re taught that whenever one copy of a gene linked to a dominant trait is present, then the offspring will exhibit that dominant trait, regardless of the other gene.
However, Non-Mendelian genes don’t follow this rule, which is the basis of Klenotiz’s argument. She says that the wizarding gene could be explained if it’s caused by a trinucleotide repeat, which is the repetition of three nucleotides — the building blocks of DNA — multiple times.
These repeats can be found in normal genes, but sometimes many more copies of this repeated code can appear in genes than is standard, causing a mutation. This kind of mutation is responsible for genetic diseases like Huntington’s Disease. Depending upon how many of these repeats occur in the genes, a person could exhibit no symptoms, could have a mild form of the disease or could have a severe form of it.
In her paper, Klenotiz argues that eggs with high levels of these repeats are more likely to be fertilized, a phenomenon known as transmission ratio distortion. She also suggests that the egg or sperm with high levels of repeats is less likely to be created or to survive in the wizarding womb.
This argument answers several questions about wizarding genetics:
How can a wizard be born to muggle parents?
Genetic mutations can randomly appear, meaning anyone could be born with the wizarding gene. However, there’s a better chance of magical offspring occurring if the parents are on the high side of the normal range for mutations.
How can a squib be born to wizard parents?
Although parents with these mutated magical genes would be likely to pass the gene on to their children, there’s still a possibility that any given offspring might not inherit the trinucleotide repeat.
How can varying degrees of magical ability be explained?
The more repeats a wizard inherits, the stronger the magical power he or she will have. If both wizarding parents are powerful wizards, it’s likely their offspring will also be powerful.
You can read Klenotiz’s full paper on wizarding genetics here.




Far and away one of the nerdiest things I’ve ever read. Love it.

ihititwithmyaxe:

mothernaturenetwork:

Harry Potter wizarding genetics decoded

If the wizarding gene is dominant, as J.K. Rowling says in her famous series of Harry Potter books, then how can a wizard be born to muggle parents (non-magical people)? And how can there be squibs (non-magical people born into wizarding lines)?

It seems these baffling genetic questions have finally been answered, thanks to Andrea Klenotiz, a biology student at the University of Delaware.

In a six-page paper, which she sent to Rowling, Klenotiz outlines how the wizarding gene works and even explains why some witches and wizards are more powerful than others.

“Magical ability could be explained by a single autosomal dominant gene if it is caused by an expansion of trinucleotide repeats with non-Mendelian ratios of inheritance,” Klenotiz explains.

What does this mean?

In school we learn the fundamentals of genetics by studying Gregory Mendel’s pea plant experiments and completing basic Punnett squares. Basically, we’re taught that whenever one copy of a gene linked to a dominant trait is present, then the offspring will exhibit that dominant trait, regardless of the other gene.

However, Non-Mendelian genes don’t follow this rule, which is the basis of Klenotiz’s argument. She says that the wizarding gene could be explained if it’s caused by a trinucleotide repeat, which is the repetition of three nucleotides — the building blocks of DNA — multiple times.

These repeats can be found in normal genes, but sometimes many more copies of this repeated code can appear in genes than is standard, causing a mutation. This kind of mutation is responsible for genetic diseases like Huntington’s Disease. Depending upon how many of these repeats occur in the genes, a person could exhibit no symptoms, could have a mild form of the disease or could have a severe form of it.

In her paper, Klenotiz argues that eggs with high levels of these repeats are more likely to be fertilized, a phenomenon known as transmission ratio distortion. She also suggests that the egg or sperm with high levels of repeats is less likely to be created or to survive in the wizarding womb.

This argument answers several questions about wizarding genetics:

How can a wizard be born to muggle parents?

Genetic mutations can randomly appear, meaning anyone could be born with the wizarding gene. However, there’s a better chance of magical offspring occurring if the parents are on the high side of the normal range for mutations.

How can a squib be born to wizard parents?

Although parents with these mutated magical genes would be likely to pass the gene on to their children, there’s still a possibility that any given offspring might not inherit the trinucleotide repeat.

How can varying degrees of magical ability be explained?

The more repeats a wizard inherits, the stronger the magical power he or she will have. If both wizarding parents are powerful wizards, it’s likely their offspring will also be powerful.

You can read Klenotiz’s full paper on wizarding genetics here.

Far and away one of the nerdiest things I’ve ever read. Love it.

(via cloysterbell)

Filed under harry potter oh my fuck this is beautiful SCIENCE

7,384 notes

THE MAGIC BEGINS [24] scariest character

“Dementors are among the foulest creatures that walk this earth. They infest the darkest, filthiest places, they glory in decay and despair, they drain peace, hope, and happiness out of the air around them… Get too near a Dementor and every good feeling, every happy memory will be sucked out of you. If it can, the Dementor will feed on you long enough to reduce you to something like itself…soulless and evil. You will be left with nothing but the worst experiences of your life.”

(via achilliad)

Filed under harry potter